Biomimicry

Dew Bank water bottle gets biomimicry inspiration from beatles

The deserts of Namibia are some of the most arid places on earth, so if something is able to survive in this harsh environment it can teach humans a thing or two about survival and intelligent design.

Disney World turns its waste to energy through industrialized biomimicry

Disney generates 35 million tonnes of food waste at its theme parks every year. This presents a major waste management headache but also a unique opportunity to introduce the concept of energy from waste to millions of people.

How a bullet train was inspired by biomimicry

The famous Shinkansen bullet train is a masterpiece of modern transport technology, not merely for its speed but also its innovative design. 

Natural ventilation? Build as termites do

Nearly twenty years old, the Eastgate centre is a combined shopping and office complex in central Harare designed by Mick Pearce. The building uses a design method that mimics that of a termites nest, which uses the unique layout to ventilate and cool the building naturally.

PAX embraces nature's flow to reduce energy

From understanding how wind and water moves to knowing how energy can flow into central electricity grids, our understanding of flow has long been locked in a man-made and mechanical concept.

Pelamis' sea snake sought to harness energy from the waves

Scotland’s Pelamis Wave Power created an innovative method of creating renewable energy from wave power, utilising a highly mobile and flexible “sea snake”. So named for its long, slender and slithering appearance, the sea snake is able to rotate to constantly face into waves - the same way a flag changes direction in the wind.

Plant-e delivers bulbs with a buzz

Sustainability and development have often been at odds in terms of what is good for the earth and what is good for humanity. But imagine being able to grow plants to store carbon, produce food and produce electricity all in the same land -  we would be able to deal with three of the largest sustainability issues in one swoop.

Using biomimicry to prolong the life of vaccines

Tardigrades are a micro-animal that have the unique capability to survive some of the harshest conditions - even beyond what could be experienced on earth. One of these capabilities is to be able to reanimate itself from a suspended, dehydrated state when it comes into contact with water.  

Why this shrimp shell makes a better helmet

The mantis shrimp, or stomatopod, has another name: the ‘thumb splitter’. That’s because this marine crustacean can literally split your thumb - not with a bite or scratch, but with its fist-like claw that punches prey with a force similar to a .22 caliber bullet.

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