Bloggers

Boeing's schoolboy social media error

Who hasn’t been on the receiving end of advice from an 8-year old about how to do your job better? Not Boeing apparently. When it received a hand-drawn idea for a new plane from young inventor Harry Winsor the company replied with a form letter saying: “Like many large companies we do not accept unsolicited ideas.

Dell's Reputation Hell

Remember how, way back in 2005, people griping on blogs about products and shoddy customer service was a new phenomenon...and something all companies believed was best left well alone.

How Walmart learned the perils of a fake blog

In 2006, Walmart was facing a public relations backlash over its labor relations policy not to mention a federal lawsuit aimed at reclaiming $33.5 million in employee overtime back pay.

Johnson & Johnson cleans up after Toxic Tub report

In 2011, Johnson & Johnson finally promised to reformulate all of its baby products to remove a formaldehyde-releasing preservative. The move was in response to continued activist pressure from the the US Campaign for Safe Cosmetics (CSC) over the use of harmful chemicals products produced by J&J along with other consumer goods companies. 

Kryptonite - The first social media fail

Who would have thought, back in 2004, that some guy posting on a web forum could wreak havoc with a reputable company like Kryptonite Locks. That was until “unaestehtic” alerted fellow users of the Bikeforums.net about picking Kryptonite's Evolution 2000 with a BIC pen....in just four moves.

When Comcast was caught napping on the couch

We’ve all had that suspicion when talking on the phone to cable/satellite/phone customer service that they could be nodding off just as we’re trying to describe our digital problem. Back in 2006 one Comcast cable guy actually did fall asleep while on the job in customer Barry Finkelstein’s apartment, on his couch to be exact.

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