The Death of Lake Poopó

For a long time it seemed impossible to convey the danger posed by climate change because it seemed an abstract concept - something impossible to illustrate in our current world. No longer. Witness this New York Times feature on the demise of Lake Poopó in Bolivia. This high altitude lake had suffered through the years from water diversion projects and the effects of the cyclical El Nino weather pattern. However over the last few decades rising temperatures tied to climate change have caused the rest of the water to evaporate. As the NYT writes: “The vanishing of Lake Poopó threatens the very identity of the Uru-Murato people, the oldest indigenous group in the area. They adapted over generations to the conquests of the Inca and the Spanish, but seem unable to adjust to the abrupt upheaval climate change has caused.”

The high cost of nuclear power

What's it going to cost to keep the lights on in a nuclear world? According to a new UK government assessment, the new Hinkley Point C nuclear power plant could cost as much as £37bn over the course of its lifetime the Guardian reports. This estimate, it writes “was described as shocking by critics of the scheme, who said it showed just how volatile and uncertain the project had become, given that the same energy department’s estimate 12 months earlier had been £14bn."

Chobani links goodness to performance with Olympic campaign

Greek yogurt brand Chobani is launching a new campaign around the Rio Olympics that ties goodness and non-artificial ingredients to sporting performance. With a tagline “You Can Only Be Great If You're Full Of Goodness” the sustainable food campaign features commercials, digital video profiles, workout routines and cooking segments with athletes Chobani is sponsoring. As AdAge writes: “The goodness wording will also be tied to the "No Bad Stuff" nomenclature Chobani has been using to emphasize that its products do not include artificial ingredients or GMOs.”

Why there’s more fish on the global diet

News now that the world is eating more fish than ever before with the global per capita fish consumption passing 20kg per year for the first time the BBC reports. It cites a new UN Food and Agriculture Organization report that attributes the rise on improved aquaculture and reduced waste. The growth in aquaculture (fish farming) is seen as a key driver in boosting the global consumption levels of fish. As one UN fish and aquaculture expert explains: "Fish is six times more efficient at converting feed than cattle, and four times more efficient than pork. Therefore increasing the consumption of fish is good for food security.”

Pokemon Go and the future of video gaming on the go

Finally today, news that Pokemon Go, the new augmented reality game for mobile phones, is already generating more revenue and getting more downloads than any other iPhone app in the US. So far the game has only been launched in the UK, Australia and New Zealand. The rest of the world still has a few days to stave off an inevitable new mobile addiction.

Have a good weekend.

Membership

Join Sustainly and access the most comprehensive database of sustainability communication case studies research.